Wednesday, 3 August 2016

Just How Dangerous Is Soda?

 Just How Dangerous Is Soda?



 " Are you slowly killing yourself with sugar? As disturbing as that sounds, millions of Americans are doing this every day. And even though we doctors constantly talk about the dangers of too much sugar... Too many people don’t get how dangerous sugar really is! High sugar consumption is linked to all kinds of serious health problems, such as: Addiction and Craving High Blood Pressure Tooth Decay Elevated Cholesterol Diabetes But... scientists have discovered another, even more serious side effect: HEART DISEASE. Yes… Heart Disease. According to research published in the esteemed Journal of the American Medical Society, eating too much sugar can significantly increase your risk of death from heart disease.1 The joint study, conducted by a team of scientists from the CDC, the Harvard School of Public Health, and Emory University, looked at people’s sugar habits in detail. Here’s what they found: People who get between 17-21% of their calories from sugar are at a far greater risk for heart disease, compared to people who eat less... 38 percent higher, in fact! But the findings get even more extreme… For the people who ate the most sugar (more than 21% of their daily calories)... Their risk for heart disease shot up to more than double that of the people who ate the least sugar! So when I tell you to avoid excessive sugar, I’m not just talking about staying slim... I’m trying to help you stay alive! And thankfully, word is spreading and people are cutting back on unhealthy foods like sugary cereals, pastries, and candy. But... there’s one area where I still see people damaging their health with sugar: Soft Drinks. Soft drinks are bursting with added sugar. But most people have no idea just how much is in there. Here are the facts: A 12oz can of Coke contains about about 9 teaspoons of sugar. But according to the American Heart Association, the maximum amount of daily sugar you should eat is: 9 teaspoons per day for Men 6 teaspoons per day for Women In other words, a single serving of Coke equals your entire daily allowance for sugar if you’re a man... And if you’re a woman, that one little can will to put you 50% over the daily limit! See how sneaky the sugar in soda can be? So you can understand why cutting out soft drinks (or at least cutting back) is the smart thing to do for your health! And just because you ditch soda doesn’t mean you have to live on tap water alone... There are many delicious options for staying hydrated and refreshed. Some of my favorite sugar-free drinks are fruit-infused water, lime-flavored seltzer, and pure coconut water. Now, if you’ve been a diehard soda drinker all your life, making the switch could take some time. But I guarantee you it’s worth it. And in my next email, I’m going to share with you a healthy new summertime drink I discovered… I think you’ll like it as much as I do. Stay tuned! For your health, Dr. Cary Nelson, MD Director of Science & Nutrition P.S. How are your soda habits? Reply to this email and let me know. Are you trying to cut back, or look for alternatives? Please be honest… because the more we know about your sugar habits, the easier it will be to find solutions.



 1Yang, Quanhe et al. "Added Sugar Intake And Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality Among US Adults". JAMA Internal Medicine 174.4 (2014): 516. Web. 21 July 2016.  "




Cyberbullying: Facts About Cyberbullying and How to Stop It

Cyberbullying: Facts About Cyberbullying and How to Stop It: "Cyberbullying: What Is Cyberbullying and How to Stop It Cyberbullying affects countless teens and adolescents. A 2015 random sample study of 11-15 year olds in the Midwest found that over 34% reported being the victim of cyberbullying in their lifetime. Other studies have found that 1 in 4 teens have been cyberbullied. Victims of cyberbullying are much more likely to use alcohol and drugs, avoid school and have poor grades, experience depression and low self-esteem, and may even contemplate suicide."




Tuesday, 24 May 2016

OECD and Pisa tests are damaging education worldwide - academics | Education | The Guardian

OECD and Pisa tests are damaging education worldwide - academics | Education | The Guardian:

 "We write to you in your capacity as OECD's (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) director of the Programme of International Student Assessment (Pisa). Now in its 13th year, Pisa is known around the world as an instrument to rank OECD and non-OECD countries (60-plus at last count) according to a measure of academic achievement of 15-year-old students in mathematics, science, and reading. Administered every three years, Pisa results are anxiously awaited by governments, education ministers, and the editorial boards of newspapers, and are cited authoritatively in countless policy reports. They have begun to deeply influence educational practices in many countries. As a result of Pisa, countries are overhauling their education systems in the hopes of improving their rankings. Lack of progress on Pisa has led to declarations of crisis and "Pisa shock" in many countries, followed by calls for resignations, and far-reaching reforms according to Pisa precepts.

We are frankly concerned about the negative consequences of the Pisa rankings. These are some of our concerns:"




5 Things to Share With Your Teachers About Educational Technology

5 Things to Share With Your Teachers About Educational Technology:

 "Even today, we still have teachers across the country fighting the integration of educational technology into their classrooms. Many use similar excuses as to why they should not waste their time learning technology. The simple fact is that they typically are nervous to learn something new and possibly failing. I think everyone can understand that feeling (especially in front of our peers and our students). So... they make up a variety of reasons why they think it is a bad idea to spend time on technology use, or they simply just close their door and leave the technology in the corner of the room. What do we do? Here is a list of the top 5 things you should share with your teachers in regards to educational technology:"




Friday, 20 May 2016

Using technology versus Integrating technology

I found two images on the internet which do a great job of explaining the different.  Check them out.



As an educational consultant, I try to...

As an educational consultant, I try to predict the future and make sure that we design our schools and prepare our students for this future.  As said by others, it is a future that we have no idea what it is going to be like.  So, how can one effectively predict and prepare without accurate knowledge?  Work with what we know.  We are not in a factory era; we are in an information era.  We need to teach students how to answer questions, not content.  The information age presents way too much information to try to learn it all.  Students need to be equipped with skills that will allow them to find the answers to anything they want to know.

There are twelve points every educational institution and educator must understand to continue to be effective in the future.
The eleven and twelve point are:

Community Access

The school should be the center of the community. When constructed correctly a facility connected to the world should welcome all members of the community to utilize what it has to offer. Lifelong learning is a goal for all members of the community and locking the doors of an educational facilities does not promote this concept. Security is a concern and is normally the reason used by naysayers who find it is easier to lock facilities down. The worthwhile effort to utilize a facility fully will greatly enhance the value of a school. A school that is a safe learning environment for all in the community can be a tremendous asset.

Some areas of the school should be designed so they can be opened to the community without giving interested parties access to the whole of the school. Such areas as a cultural center, stage, and cafeteria, kitchen and gym should be secure and include washrooms and separate entrances. This design will allow each of the areas to be used separately by the community after school hours. Somewhere in the school, a historical record of the School and community should be displayed in pictures or art. The school should reflect the community and also be a central part of the community. To make the community a bigger part of the school requires the administration and educators to be willing to facilitate this. It comes with security issues, costs, and scheduling issues but the benefits should far outweigh the negatives.

Boundaries

The 21 years of age dictated by most departments of education as the cut-off age for interested parties to access high school education free in Canada is not something that should be a boundary in these facilities. Anyone who realistically wishes to complete their high school education should be able to within these new facilities.

The concept of grades should not be applied as rigorously as it is currently done within many educational facilities. A learner should be working at the level at which they can achieve success. Education should work in a step-by-step process that will allow the learner to fulfill all the objectives to achieve graduation at whatever rate fits their current lifestyle and goals. Education should be available to students when they are ready to be educated.

The flexibility of online learning, shared First Nations curriculums, and technology are all elements that will make it easier to create individual programs to meet each unique learner’s cultural and learning needs.

An exploration of the elimination of the grade separation of the students into classrooms is the future of education. Individual programs designed for each of the students might create an educational environment which would better provide the necessary resources and learning that the students require. If this goal is reached the need for classrooms at each grade level will not be necessary and informal learning rooms will be needed. But until such a program is implemented then grade classrooms are needed.
Any questions contact me at: dcannell5@gmail.com

Tuesday, 17 May 2016

As an educational consultant, I try to... (Part 9 and 10)

As an educational consultant, I try to predict the future and make sure that we design our schools and prepare our students for this future.  As said by others, it is a future that we have no idea what it is going to be like.  So, how can one effectively predict and prepare without accurate knowledge?  Work with what we know.  We are not in a factory era; we are in an information era.  We need to teach students how to answer questions, not content.  The information age presents way too much information to try to learn it all.  Students need to be equipped with skills that will allow them to find the answers to anything they want to know.

There are twelve points every educational institution and educator must understand to continue to be effective in the future.
The nine and ten point are:

Paperless schools

The concept of paperless schools is not a goal of the future it is here. There are numerous schools across the world which have effectively eliminated paper from the school environment. Technology and an ever increasing number of applications have made it possible to painlessly work towards the reduction and elimination of paper use in the schools. The installation of monitors in hallways and classrooms to share daily notices is a simple example of how it is not necessary to print out a daily notice sheet. The monthly school letter can be distributed electronically on the school website and via email. Scanners rather than printers, fax machines, and photocopiers will help achieve this paperless goal.

A paperless school will require technology for the sharing of information. TV monitors installed throughout the school and in classrooms can be used to share. One to one tablet programs can be used to share information which is done instead of photocopying notices and administrative procedures. Google offers many programs which can be used to store documents and create digital information and products. This will allow the students to share documents with each other and their teachers. This program will also need the educators to become trained in the use of Google tools.



Spiritual Cultural area

Space is needed within the walls of a school to allow the spiritual and cultural growth of learners. These areas should be very central in the school, so it allows them to help in the welcoming and spiritual atmosphere of the institution. The location within the building also speaks to the importance attributed to cultural awareness. These areas focus on cultural awareness, curriculum development, language learning, cultural celebrations, workshops, and the sharing of traditional life skills. These are only a few of the activities that could happen in the cultural area.

Cultural education and technology must be infused into the curriculum and not treated as a one-off or add-on. Master teachers and elders need space within these areas to allow them access to the students and to be involved in the development of curriculum and educational support.

A spiritual, cultural area or room should be one of the first things people see as they enter a First Nation school or Catholic School. A traditional public school should also have a welcome area of some sort in the entrance of the school. The welcome area should celebrate the culture, atmosphere or whatever the school stands for in the community. The cultural area should be a flexible area which can be adapted to necessary needs. The area should allow for cultural celebrations, workshops and other spiritual and cultural activities. For example in a First Nation School, it should include First Nations artwork and elements creating a welcoming and spiritual atmosphere. Dance, music and art all need to be a focus of the education within all Schools to allow for the promotion of the student’s culture.


Monday, 16 May 2016

As an educational consultant, I try to... (Part 7 and 8)

As an educational consultant, I try to predict the future and make sure that we design our schools and prepare our students for this future.  As said by others, it is a future that we have no idea what it is going to be like.  So, how can one effectively predict and prepare without accurate knowledge?  Work with what we know.  We are not in a factory era; we are in an information era.  We need to teach students how to answer questions, not content.  The information age presents way too much information to try to learn it all.  Students need to be equipped with skills that will allow them to find the answers to anything they want to know.
There are twelve points every educational institution and educator must understand to continue to be effective in the future.
The seven and eight point are:

Computer Labs Conversion
Computer labs in the schools need to be converted into digital production space.  In the information age students need space to create, consume, remix and share material with each other and across the world.  Students today are “interpersonal, logical, special, intrapersonal, musical, linguistic, naturalist and body-kinesthetic learners.  Educators needed to incorporate the authentic learning characteristics of the real-world relevance of active learning.  The quick adoption of social networking by the youths of the world both surprised and frightened the educational systems and have resulted in a banning of many of the Web2.0 tools in schools.  Educators who use the current web tools create a learning environment and community which reflects the reality of the students living in the information age.   Creation of a connected learning environment is dynamic and motivating in worldly variation.

A digital production space would be very beneficial to the upper grades by allowing them to do active learning.  The educators will require training to assist the students in becoming the interpersonal, logical, special, intrapersonal, musical, linguistic, naturalist and body-kinesthetic learners.  The tools that the internet and computers provide allow students a variety of mediums and techniques to create and share their works, interests, and passions with the world.  A well-trained instructor can show the students how to prepare themselves to utilize the best of what the internet has to offer and protect themselves from the worst.  Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and other social networking sites are all a reality which can be great for digital sharing, but they also come with many pitfalls.   It is not acceptable to ban students from these sites and hope that if and when they get on them in their private life they will be able to navigate safely in them.  It is the school’s job to educate, and these sites are part of the students’ world now and in the future.  It will require training for students to be aware and control their digital footprint in the world.


Book library

Today’s children have new needs, new capabilities, new capacities; they are significantly different in nature from children born before the existence of the 'wired' world.  The “wired” students are accustomed to having personal interest information at their fingertips and like the challenge of lifelong learning.  Creating a lifelong learner is the new goal of twenty-first-century education and can only be achieved by an educator who shares the lifelong learner characteristic. We must all develop the aptitudes and dispositions of lifelong learning if we are to thrive in our dynamic and pluralistic age.

Using the internet is akin to teaching in the largest library in the world.  The internet is just a click of the mouse away.  The sage on the stage and the book library of the past pales next to the vastness of the internet resources.  It allows teachers to remove themselves from being the focus of the education and allows the students (learners) to be the center of the process.  The learners can actively participate in thinking and discussing ideas while making meaning for themselves.  The content, instruction and assignments effectively delivered via digital devices will naturally changes the teacher’s role to more of a guide. 

The library should be repurposed into a resource room for a one to one tablet program.  For approximately the same cost of a well stocked K-12 library, a Kindle for each student with a subscription to Kindle Unlimited would give the students access to 800,000 titles on Amazon for 9.99 a month per student.  The other uses of a tablet will give the student access to other websites other than Amazon.  The Library should include charging stations and resource rooms for educational tutoring.  The change of purpose of the library will require a trained information processing person who can facilitate a tablet program.  A well-designed program will help a school become paperless as it can be used to share daily notices, assignment, grades, and other administrative information.


Any questions email:  dcannell5@gmail.com


Sunday, 15 May 2016

As an educational consultant, I try to... (Part 5 and 6)

As an educational consultant, I try to predict the future and make sure that we design our schools and prepare our students for this future.  As said by others, it is a future that we have no idea what it is going to be like.  So, how can one effectively predict and prepare without accurate knowledge?  Work with what we know.  We are not in a factory era; we are in an information era.  We need to teach students how to answer questions, not content.  The information age presents way too much information to try to learn it all.  Students need to be equipped with skills that will allow them to find the answers to anything they want to know.
There are twelve points every educational institution and educator must understand to continue to be effective in the future.
The five and six point is:

Removing the walls
Collaborative work with other schools, community members, and countries will help bring the world into the modern classroom.  The technology effectively removes the barrier of distance.  Pain free connection with other educational sources can greatly enhance motivation in the modern classroom.  Communication technology can remove some of the limitation created when a school is a silo protected from the outside world.  This connection with others will require the tools, and spaces which easily and effectively allow for the necessary communication to occur.

The smart boards within the classrooms are a tool which can be used to facilitate collaboration via Skype or Google Hangouts.  Professional development will be necessary to help the staff effectively use the technology and connect to others in distant educational institutions.  The internet is a powerful communication, collaborative tool which when used effectively can bring the world into the classroom.  Content experts, other schools, teachers, students and people from around the world can easily be brought into the classroom using the available tools.  Sharing of school created materials with others around the world can also be used as a powerful motivational tool.
Elders, guests, and school trips are used to enhance classroom learning, and this practice should be expanded.

Emphasis and De-emphasis
Research has shown that much of the learning that occurs in schools happens outside the classroom.  Some research states that less than 25% of the learning happens within the formal classroom.  This research emphasizes the development of less formal learning space in the modern school.  Informal learning occurs in the flexible non traditional learning space found in a school.  The creation of these spaces can and should be considered when developing the modern day facilities for learning.  The de-emphasis of the formal classroom requires the development of self-learning and collaborative workspaces.  Spaces need not be furnished with the formal class desks in rows but with more creative, flexible workstations.  Many traditionalist educators find this trend challenging as it requires a change from the lecture style of teaching.  A supportive training program for teachers will help in the effective use of new spaces, nooks, and corners.

  

Friday, 13 May 2016

As an educational consultant, I try to... (Part 3 and 4)

As an educational consultant, I try to predict the future and make sure that we design our schools and prepare our students for this future.  As said by others, it is a future that we have no idea what it is going to be like.  So, how can one effectively predict and prepare without accurate knowledge?  Work with what we know.  We are not in a factory era; we are in an information era.  We need to teach students how to answer questions, not content.  The information age presents way too much information to try to learn it all.  Students need to be equipped with skills that will allow them to find the answers to anything they want to know.
There are twelve points every educational institution and educator must understand to continue to be effective in the future.
The third and fourth are

Wireless
The complete educational areas within a facility need coverage with wireless accessibility.    Faculty and students should be able to roam freely in all areas of the school and be connected.  Wireless technology has improved so that it is now possible to provide this coverage effectively and is not cost prohibitive.  The access to a wireless network needs to be secure but also painless for students to use a variety of school-owned equipment as well as a student’s own devices.

Many schools have 100% wireless coverage.  Security protocol and acceptable-use policies will be necessary to facilitate students bringing their own devices to school.  Each of the classrooms will require charging stations and others should be available throughout the school in common areas.
A security system which tracks who is logged into the wifi system and what they are doing on the system is a must.  This level of security will allow for the safely of the students and other users.  Just as it is necessary to know who is on your school’s physical space and what are they doing, the same thing applies to the virtual space.  A well-trained employee will make for a wireless system which is safe but is also easily accessed and is of value to the users.

Online teaching and learning

How and what is being taught can be enhanced by using an online curriculum, tools, and pedagogy.  The access to this online support material will redefine how and what is taught.  Effective educational change can be driven by providing supportive information, training, content and tools to a world-class teacher to develop a more individual, collaborative, project-based approach to teaching.  Technology can present relevant on-demand content that allows the teacher to move away from the “sage on the stage” to more of a facilitator.

This current educational trend and research that speaks to this is the “Flip Classroom” movement.
Online teaching or learning should occur in the school, and access to the Saskatchewan Curriculum guides online is a resource which should be accessed by the teachers.  Below are three commonly used programs in schools:

Lezia Learning   Lexia reading is a technology-based reading program that increase reading proficiency for all students pre-K –grade 4 and at-risk students grade 4-12.
Starfall  Free site to teach the basics of reading.  Features interactive books and phonics games.
Mathletics  Mathletics is the next generation in online math learning platform, helping students enjoy math and improve their results.

To fully utilize these online programs and others, classroom computer pods would allow for successful individual scheduled access.  The computers on wheels will also facilitate this.  The computers on wheels do require planning, setup and are usually scheduled for the class as a whole.

The use of online material can change the way the school functions.  In an information society, like the one that is accessible on the internet, a teacher should not be teaching content.  A teacher should work as a guide on the side and facilitate the use of online apps, games, learning tools, and full courses.  The items mention above can assist a teacher by providing lesson plans, materials to share with students, individual programs for students at different learning levels, support materials as well as full courses.  The teacher via internet communication tools can invite content experts digitally into their classroom. Access to online courses can allow students access to master teachers as well as expand the available course offerings at a smaller school.  The flip classroom concept can be implemented which is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed.  The students do content exploration through short educational videos, cyber school course or online material as homework and then in-class time is devoted to exercises, teacher help, discussiom, and projects.  The most successful integration of technology is a hybrid model of “traditional classroom teaching approach” and “interactive online technological digital sharing, collaboration, and creation of material”.

For more information contact Darren Cannell Educational Consultant.

Dcannell5@gmail.com


Thursday, 12 May 2016

As an educational consultant, I try to... (Part 2)

As an educational consultant, I try to predict the future and make sure that we design our schools and prepare our students for this future.  As said by others, it is a future that we have no idea what it is going to be like.  So, how can one effectively predict and prepare without accurate knowledge?  Work with what we know.  We are not in a factory era; we are in an information era.  We need to teach students how to answer questions, not content.  The information age presents way too much information to try to learn it all.  Students need to be equipped with skills that will allow them to find the answers to anything they want to know.
There are twelve points every educational institution and educator must understand to continue to be effective in the future.
The second point is:

Level of Connectivity
The level of connectivity that is necessary to enhance learning by using educational technology in the modern school is measured by what is the best level available.  Good enough is not a term that should ever refer to the level of internet connectivity in schools.  The best available level of connectivity is the only level that is good enough.  High connectivity to the internet can remove the wall of a school and bring the world into the classroom.  It is one of the most important aspects of preparing a school for the future.  The only other element that will have as much impact on modern education is the access to well-trained, world-class educators.  All other trends in this list hinge on the connectivity within the facility.
Most schools in Canada currently has a 10mb line into the building but should aim to increase this as much as possible.  A minimum target should be 100 mbs.  To prepare a school for the future, technology and the internet needs to be seamlessly integrated into the student’s learning.  Technology, the internet and computers cannot be a stand-alone subject which is taught.  These need to be part of every subject and used like the pen, paper and textbooks use to be.  To effectively make this happen, the educators within the building will need to be professionally trained and need to embrace a technological life-long learning approach for themselves.  Technology is ever changing and is doing so at a rapid rate.  Without a life-long learning approach an educator will rapidly become unknowledgeable of the environment in which the students will excel.
Test of the wireless connectivity produced the following results:
In comparison my SaskTel broadband home numbers in Saskatoon are as follows:
Ping 83 ms
Download: 2.56 mbps
Upload: 69 mbps
Ping is the reachability test to measure the round-trip time it takes your computer to send a request and receive an answer from your destination server.
The following chart will give you an understanding as to what is required for different internet activities. (Taken from the US Federal Communication Commission)

Activity
Minimum download speed (Mbps)
Email
0.5
Web Browsing

Job searching, navigating government websites
0.5
Interactive pages short educational videos
1.0
Streaming radio
Less than 0.5
Internet phone calls (voip)
Less than 0.5
Watching Video

Standard streaming videos
0.7
Streaming feature movies
1.5
Video Conferencing

Basic video conference and telelearning
4.0
Gaming

Game console connecting to the internet
1.0
Two-way online gaming in HD
4.0


For more information contact Darren Cannell Educational Consultant.

Dcannell5@gmail.com

Wednesday, 11 May 2016

As an educational consultant I try to...(Part One)

As an educational consultant, I try to predict the future and make sure that we design our schools and prepare our students for this future.  As said by others, it is a future that we have no idea what it is going to be like.  So, how can one effectively predict and prepare without accurate knowledge?  Work with what we know.  We are not in a factory era; we are in an information era.  We need to teach students how to answer questions, not content.  The information age presents way too much information to try to learn it all.  Students need to be equipped with skills that will allow them to find the answers to anything they want to know.
There are twelve points every educational institution and educator must understand to continue to be effective in the future.
The first point is:
Access to technology
In the past, access to technology was achieved by creating a computer lab in which the student would be given selected scheduled time in which to sit in front of a desktop computer doing technology training and internet access.  The computer lab was the most cost effective way to make sure that students had some access to technology.  The need to have a computer lab in the modern school became a thing of the past when portable computing devices decreased in price and were owned by much of the student body.  It is now possible, cost effective, and practical for all students in grade four and above to have continuous access to portable technology that would give them access to the internet when and where it is required.  The accommodation that this requires is an area where such technology can be stored and charged.
The current educational trend and research which speaks to this is the “one to one” movement.
School Computers labs have followed a familiar path.  The computers have one by one broken down until the computer labs are of no use.  The ease of use when taking a class into a room with enough computers for each student to have access was a great situation.  A fully functional maintained computer lab is very expensive and requires a person responsible to maintain daily the machines.
Many modern classrooms have a teacher computers which has wired connectivity, these are administrative machines and are not used by the students.  These are the machines which should be connected to the smartboards in the classrooms or a projector of some sort for sharing digital material.  Security around these devices is important, and the machines should be locked when not in use by the teacher.
If desktop computers are included in the school as educational tools for students, they should be added as pods within the classrooms and other areas of the school.  Each pod should contain between 2-4 desktop machines.  These computers can be used for individual work, active learning, and digital production space.  These machines should contain the most commonly used word processing software and other software utilized by the school.  Any users of these machines should be required to log into the machine to gain access.  Once a student logs off the machine, it should clean itself and prepare itself for the next student.  There is school security software which is available and able to assist in the maintenance of these machines.   Location of these machines should be where they can be supervised.
Access to technology goal for schools should be a one to one computing program with enough portable computing devices for each student in the school.  Such a program requires a location within the building where the devices can be charged and secured.  The Library or resource room is the best place for this, and it will be necessary to include electrical charging area and a lock up room.  The library should also include the printing center for the building as well.  This allows the resource teacher within the library to control the use of paper.  Older students should be trusted with more technology and allowed to use it in other areas of the community and not only in the school.  Students in this day and age need to be technologically literate to compete in the world market.

For more information contact Darren Cannell Educational Consultant.

Dcannell5@gmail.com

Sunday, 8 May 2016

First Nation Educational Consulting



I have been fortunate enough to have had the opportunity to on two separate occasions to consult in First Nations Schools.  The first I was asked to develop a plan to retool a high school which was not having graduation success with their program.  Over a period of ten months, I dedicated time to developing a new program which respects the culture and allows the student to utilize their strengths to experience success and in the end graduate.  The traditional curriculums have many barriers which are not only a challenge for first nation's students but are a challenge for all students.  The world has changed, but the approach to education has not matched this rapid change.  This has resulted in a factory style of content delivery failing to achieve the demands brought forth by the information age.  The approach which was developed during the above mentioned consulting was applied a second time and further refined to a program which could be useful in many schools.  If you are interested in learning more, drop me a line.